Easter In Paris

photo: cafe st andre des arts

One of the 'sweet' days on a terrace in the Latin Quarter.

Puts Egg On My Face Again

by Ric Erickson

Paris:- Monday, 5. April 1999:- This is what I used for a lead last week: "If you are one of the types too busy to gawk at Paris' Webcam to see what the weather is like, it is like this: one day is sunny and cool and the following day is rainy and cool. In short, it is spring weather." This week: no change.

With this vitally important news out of the way, I can go on to other consequential matters to fill up this space.

Somehow Easter snuck up on me and all weekend I have been aware that Easter is very early in the year. Until this morning, that is. I decidedphoto: int: brasserie in st louis to verify how early it is, only to find that Easter Sunday was on 12. April last year, and in 1997 it was in March - on the 30th.

This means that Easter has been neither 'early' nor 'late' but is just about where it should be. Now all I have to do, is find out where I am in the time-scheme of things.

Inside the Alsacian Brasserie Ile Saint-Louis last week.

Europe's Nasty Easter War

This subject has no place in this magazine but I can't help but be aware it must be high in the consciousness of many readers. It is certainly causing a lot of concern in Europe and there is a lot of online activity - both 'pro' and 'contra.'

I subscribe to Steve Carlson's 'Online Europe' newsletter which he runs out of Budapest, and he has forwarded a posting from the Dutch-based 'Nettime' news service. As an example of the links available, Nettime can tell you how to tune into Belgrade's Radio B-92, which had its radio plug pulled. Maybe off the air, but on the 'Net. Maybe out of sight, but online.

Tocqueville This Week

Again I skipped 'The Tocqueville Connection's' 'Balkan War' news and turned to its French culture section this week, to read Roland Flamini's take on Paris' Year-2000 plans. Even though his piece is datelined 1. April, he's got more detailed information than I've seen - as well as some that has already been reported in Metropole. But there is some new stuff too, so take a look.

The French Search Engines

Some people have an incapacity when it comes to trying to operate a Minitel. I am one of them. For what I suspect may be aphoto: rue bievre, paris 5 similar reason, I have a great deal of difficulty finding anything with a France-based Web search engine - if I do find anything in France, I do it with stock AltaVista.

I am sure it is all my fault. Even though I have a telephone and its number has not changed for 12 years, I cannot 'find' myself in any local version of the online 'white' pages. I know France Telecom is trying hard, but I am personally '404'- Not Found.

The Latin Quarter's Rue Bièvre under a spring sky.

With the existing search services, you have to put in too much information - the very items you are searching for - to get results. This situation may have changed with the recent launch of EU-Info, which is supposed to be an 'inverse' search motor.

This means, if you know the telephone number, this service will return the name of the phone subscriber. However, I use an old browser - to be sure readers with 'old' browsers don't have any problems reading this magazine - so all the new 'Java' stuff throws up on me. In short, when I put my name into 'EU-Info' it couldn't find me and when I put my telephone number into it, it crashed my system.

I think it is time I starting using one of the newer browsers I have installed. After all, I manage to drink enough java without slopping it all over myself.

'Luberon News Magazine'

With countless regions and 60 departments, France is just as hard to get to know really well as Paris. Luberon is a region and now it is online with its 'Luberonscope.' If you happen to know where it is, you might actually be interested in it. If you've never heard about it before, hitting this Web site is an excellent way of fillingphoto: garden behind notre dame a big hole in your knowledge databank and perhaps you may even find a quiet corner of France for your retirement home.

Behind Notre-Dame, last Wednesday.

Montmartre Still Online

When I heard about 'Paris18 Net' some weeks ago I took a look at what seemed a good idea, but a bit wobbly. Two weeks ago the information came to me again, and it said 'Paris18' is a doorway to 600 Web sites up on the Butte. Grouped into eight large categories and even visitors are supposed to be able to find information about all their favorite Montmartre places. Give them a tryout. For giving 'Paris18' a plug last week I got a 'thankyou,' so here's another plug.

Paris' 'LiveCam' Shows Spring Weather

Metropole readers are giving this site a hit because they think I should know about the weather in Paris. Readers have stopped writing to tell me about the weather here, but thank you all the same. Typical early spring weather looks like Paris bathed in bright, blinding sunlight or dull and chilly overcast - just like last week. I will content myself with looking out of a closed window - one magically cleaned during the week, probably by the same people who make Easter eggs.

count down Eiffel TowerThis Was Metropole One Year Ago:

Issue 3.14 - 6. April 1998 - This issue featured the columns - Café Metropole - 'Papon Trial Finally Winds Up' and 'Au Bistro' had - 'Le Pen Loses Civil Rights; Is Fined.' The issue had four features; entitled 'Not the Cheapest Bargins I've Seen - Rue d'Alésia,' 'In South Paris In the Rain - Rue d'Alésia,' ''Nova:' 10 Francs - 'Generation-X' on the Cheap' and 'Suburbs - A Lost Weekend in the Village.' There were four 'Posters of the Week' and Ric's Cartoon of the Week was captioned, 'Watercolors'

The Tour Eiffel Countdown to 31. December 1999:

Only 271 more cool days of light rain and occasionally strengthening sun.

Regards, Ric
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contents to: Ric Erickson, Editor.
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